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Precariously perched books at the derby square used book store in Salem, Massachusetts.

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Four Things Museums Can Learn From Sharknado

Thought there might be some disaster management tips here, but no.

Museum Minute

This is not a paid endorsement for The SyFy Channel. In fact, I understand that SyFy isn’t for everyone – just like C-SPAN and Powerblock TV isn’t for everyone.

I’m a sucker for SyFy movies. As someone who lives and breathes history, which I find incredibly exciting (and at times exhilarating), the thing about history is that it isn’t always so happy. That being said, there is always something to be learned from history, a silver lining (no matter how small or seemingly unimportant), and the repercussions of history cannot be argued. While it’s hard for a history lover for me to admit, I completely acknowledge (and agree) that history can be a downer. After a long day of reading about chattel slavery, the civil war, segregation, genocide, etc., I truly appreciate a bizarre SyFy film.

So, why am I talking about SyFy films?

If you missed the cultural…

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Exactly What’s in a Teaching Portfolio?

For those inclined towards an academic career, the Society for Historical Archaeology has a couple of practical blog posts on the application and interview process.

First is Stacy Lynn Camp on what to send when you’re asked for a teaching portfolio:

My teaching portfolio comprised of qualitative and quantitative data from my teaching evaluations, letters of support from professors who supervised me as their teaching assistant, letters of support from former students, handouts and assignments from my classes, syllabi from courses I hoped to teach at the University of Idaho, examples of graded papers and my feedback on student assignments, a faculty member’s assessment of my teaching in the classroom. and, perhaps most importantly, my teaching philosophy statement.

Read the rest (with references on pedagogy!) at the SHA blog.