If a Museum needed a passenger pigeon…

Where Could You Buy a Passenger Pigeon in 1908?

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Waco Mammoths want to be a National Monument

Researchers believe at least 19 Columbian mammoths were drowned by a flash flood about 65,000 years ago. Now, a petition has been started to have the site declared a National Monument. Here’s the text of the petition:

Add the Waco Mammoth Site to the National Park Service as a national monument by executive order.

Located in Waco, Texas, the Waco Mammoth Site provides a rare glimpse into the natural history of the southwest United States. It is one of the few sites where visitors can view the fossil remains of Ice Age animals lying where they died up to 70,000 years ago. Including the site as a national monument would further enhance the value of this experience.

The site already has a state-of-the-art shelter and welcome center furnished by the community of Waco and Baylor University. National monument status would allow it to add classrooms, labs, and exhibit spaces, as well as resume excavation.

The National Park Service supports adding the Waco Mammoth Site as a national monument, but Congress has twice failed to act on the matter. Therefore, an executive order is needed.

They’ve got a long way to go, but If you’re interested, sign the petition at the White House site. See the Waco Mammoth site here.

Rediscovering Lost Movie Sites

Filming sites of early silent movies survive in New York and New Jersey and many dedicated researchers are rediscovering them and documenting their existence.

Surveying Silent Film Sites

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Photo source: New York Times, Fort Lee Film Commission. “Theda Bara, left, filmed in “Carmen” in about 1915 in Fort Lee, N.J., vamping on a rock still visible at an apartment complex on Main Street.”

Four Things Museums Can Learn From Sharknado

Thought there might be some disaster management tips here, but no.

Museum Minute

This is not a paid endorsement for The SyFy Channel. In fact, I understand that SyFy isn’t for everyone – just like C-SPAN and Powerblock TV isn’t for everyone.

I’m a sucker for SyFy movies. As someone who lives and breathes history, which I find incredibly exciting (and at times exhilarating), the thing about history is that it isn’t always so happy. That being said, there is always something to be learned from history, a silver lining (no matter how small or seemingly unimportant), and the repercussions of history cannot be argued. While it’s hard for a history lover for me to admit, I completely acknowledge (and agree) that history can be a downer. After a long day of reading about chattel slavery, the civil war, segregation, genocide, etc., I truly appreciate a bizarre SyFy film.

So, why am I talking about SyFy films?

If you missed the cultural…

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