“Being a migrant farmworker is more reliable. At least you know you’re going to work next year.”

Ken Layne, formerly of Gawker, on job security in the new (and old) media world.

Columbia Journalism Review

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Sardis dig yields enigmatic trove: ritual egg in a pot

Ancientfoods

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A ritual deposit, found intact beneath a first century Roman house in Sardis. The deposit, found inside two bowls, includes a number of small implements, a unique coin and an egg. The hole in the egg was made in antiquity.

Photos: Archaeological Exploration of Sardis/Harvard University
Topic: Ritual find and an egg

Sardis dig yields enigmatic trove: ritual egg in a pot

A ritual deposit, found intact beneath a first century Roman house in Sardis. The deposit, found inside two bowls, includes a number of small implements, a unique coin and an egg. The hole in the egg was made in antiquity.

By any measure, the ancient city of Sardis — home of the fabled King Croesus, a name synonymous with gold and vast wealth, and the city where coinage was invented — is an archaeological wonder.

The ruins of Sardis, in what is now Turkey, have been a rich…

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Learn archaeological mapping in Death Valley

A reasonably priced opportunity to visit Death Valley for educational purposes:

Compass to Computer: Learning the Basics of Archeological Mapping
The National Center for Preservation Technology and Training and Death Valley National Monument are partnering to host a three-day workshop on archeological mapping. The workshop will be held March 11-13, 2014 at Death Valley Monument. The workshop is limited to 20 participants, so please reserve your spot early. Tuition for the workshop is $350 and there is a reduced rate of $250 for students.
Participants will learn the fundamental of archeological mapping using a variety of technologies and techniques. We will map a variety of archeological sites located across Death Valley National Monument—an amazing setting in the spring. We will start with the basics—a compass and tapes—then move through GPS, survey grade GPS, and finally, total station mapping. Laying out a grid, piece-plotting artifacts and mapping features will all be covered in the three day course.

So that’s why they have rumble seats in the back

The Subaru Brat, the most dangerous looking passenger seats ever, and the Chicken Tax. The video from Motor Trend Channel explains the connection (about 4 minutes in) and takes a great looking red and white Brat offroad.

Source: http://www.peopleswheels.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Subaru-Brat-aldenjewell.jpg

Source: http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/236x/e5/68/68/e56868c3f4c12941f8072743b30e80f9.jpg